2012 OLYMPIC GOLD MEDALIST (400 MEDLEY RELAY)  •  2012 OLYMPIC SILVER MEDALIST (100 BACKSTROKE)  •  2011 WORLD CHAMPION (400 MEDLEY RELAY)  •  2X WORLD RECORD HOLDER (100 BACKSTROKE, 400 MEDLEY RELAY 25-METER POOL)
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Nick Thoman

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Personal Quotes
I'm just starting to come around as a swimmer. I'm just coming into my own. The training that I've been doing and where I've been training have really helped my swimming.
Personal Info

Born On:  March 6, 1986
Hometown:  Cincinatti, Ohio
Resides:  Charlotte, NC
Education:  University of Arizona
Height:  6' 1

Biography

When it comes to backstroking, Nick Thoman has history on his side.

He hails originally from Cincinnati, which has been a hotbed for developing elite, world-class backstrokers for more than three decades. In addition to that, his grandfather Richard Thoman was a World Record holder in the 100 yard backstroke in the 1950’s.

Nick has followed fate and become one of the world’s top backstrokers himself, and is the current World Record holder in the 100 in short course meters.

Aside from his great swimming pedigree, it’s his attitude and work ethic that have made him a World Record holder and an Olympian. Thoman has developed a reputation as one of the best trainers in the world, and he demonstrated that in early December of 2011. He and his SwimMAC teammates put on some racing suits for a training test during their afternoon workout, and he proceeded to swim a 43.9 100 yard backstroke.

For the record, that’s almost a second faster than anybody has ever been in a meet, and Thoman did it in practice.

 His phenomenal backstroke time kicked off a buzz around the country, and even spurned a “What can you do in 43.9 seconds?” nationwide video contest. Entries, both swimming-related and not, came in from around the country, as his feat lit a fire of excitement throughout the swimming community.

This is how Nick approaches his training, though. He gets worn-down in season like everyone else; he has days where he wishes that he could skate through and do the bare minimum to complete a practice. But he doesn’t. Nick approaches his workouts with an edge that is unparalleled in the sport today. He sees every race, every practice, every drill, every warm-up and every cool-down as an opportunity to get better.

Getting better was a mission accomplished for Thoman in 2012. First, he successfully fought off a loaded American backstroke field to make the Olympic team. A month later, he stepped onto the main stage and took a silver medal at the Summer Olympics. There he placed behind only American teammate Matt Grevers in the 100 backstroke. He also scored gold as a member of the U.S. 400 medley relay that dominated their global competition.

He trains as hard as anybody in the world, so that he doesn’t have to rely on miracles when it comes time to race. He knows that he can fall back on hours upon hours of full-effort workouts. Nick does what others won’t in practice, so that he can do what others can’t in competition.